New Jersey parents may be concerned about the safety of their teens driving during the summer months. With summer comes a break from school and a range of new activities that may prompt teens to drive more frequently. Jobs, internships, camps, parties and other summer activities often require teens to transport themselves, so they may find themselves driving much more frequently than they do during the school year. In addition, restrictions like curfews are often loosened during the summer, so teens may be more likely to drive at night.

While summer may not officially begin until late June, Memorial Day has long been considered the unofficial launch of the season that ends informally on Labor Day. The 100-day period between these holidays is associated with a range of injuries from a variety of causes, including motor vehicle accidents. Of course, car crashes aren’t the only cause of summertime injuries; many warm-weather activities carry with them some risk. Still, they are a significant contributor to the busy schedules of emergency personnel during the summer months.

Statistics indicate that summer driving can be particularly dangerous when teens are involved. The Ford Motor Co. warns that driving in the summer can be dangerous for young drivers, an alert backed up by the American Automobile Association. The AAA calls the summer months the “100 deadliest days” for teens behind the wheel. It urges parents to promote safe driving, noting that teens are often inexperienced drivers who should take special care to avoid distraction or unnecessary night driving.

Car crashes can be especially devastating when teens are involved and suffer serious injuries or permanent disabilities. People injured in a crash caused by someone else’s negligence may want to consult with a personal injury lawyer about pursuing compensation for their damages.